What does graft mean in knitting?

In knitting, grafting is the joining of two knitted fabrics using yarn and a needle in one of three types of seams: selvage-to-selvage seam, selvage-to-end (“wales”) seam, or. end-to-end (“wale-to-wale”) seam.

What does graft stitches together mean?

Grafting (also called kitchener stitch) is a technique used to join two pieces of knitting without any seam by joining together the live stitches of each piece.

Is Kitchener Stitch same as grafting?

It’s not magic! It’s called the Kitchener stitch. The Kitchener stitch (also known as “grafting”) involves weaving two live (still on the needle) edges together without creating a ridge — or even a break in the stitching.

Can you knit two pieces together?

Grafting: This is an excellent way of invisibly joining two pieces of knitting. The edges are not cast off and the knitting can be joined either while it is still on the needles or after it has been taken off. Grafting with knitting on the needles: Thread a wool or tapestry needle with a length of knitting yarn.

Why is it called Kitchener stitch?

During the First World War it is said that Herbert Kitchener, British Secretary of State for War, prompted the invention of a special graft for socks to prevent chafing. It came to be known as ‘the Kitchener Stitch’.

What is Kitchener stitch used for?

The kitchener stitch is a way to graft live stitches together creating a seamless join. It’s often used to close up the toes of socks or shoulder seams, (among other things).

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What is a mattress stitch?

The Mattress Stitch is a finishing technique for vertical seaming. It creates an invisible join between pieces worked in stockinette stitch or ribbing, perfect for so many things, such as sewing the front and back of a sweater together.