Who invented the Kitchener Stitch?

During the First World War it is said that Herbert Kitchener, British Secretary of State for War, prompted the invention of a special graft for socks to prevent chafing. It came to be known as ‘the Kitchener Stitch’.

Who is Kitchener stitch named after?

The Kitchener stitch is a common method for the third type of seam. The yarn follows the route of a row of ordinary knitting. This is often done when closing off a knitted sock at the toe. The technique is named after Horatio Herbert Kitchener, though the technique was practiced long before.

What does graft mean in knitting?

Grafting (also called kitchener stitch) is a technique used to join two pieces of knitting without any seam by joining together the live stitches of each piece.

How do you do a no sew Kitchener Stitch?

Here are the written instructions:

  1. Purl on the front needle, pull yarn through, pull that stitch off the needle.
  2. Knit on the front needle, pull yarn through, leave that stitch on.
  3. Knit on the back needle, pull yarn through, pull that stitch off the needle.
  4. Purl on the back needle, pull yarn through, leave that stitch on.

What is a mattress stitch?

The Mattress Stitch is a finishing technique for vertical seaming. It creates an invisible join between pieces worked in stockinette stitch or ribbing, perfect for so many things, such as sewing the front and back of a sweater together.

IT IS INTERESTING:  What is more expensive yarn dyeing or piece dyeing?

How much yarn do you leave for Kitchener Stitch?

Thread a length of working yarn three times the length of the pieces you are joining onto a tapestry needle. Hold work so you have a front knitting needle and back knitting needle.